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Abolish Menu-bars

  

Topaz Brainstorm

Score 67%
Abolish Menu-bars
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Abolish Menu-bars
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Abolish Menu-bars
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Downloads:  21
Submitted:  Jan 6 2010

Description:

I propose that menus come to be from right-clicks and only right clicks. Most users associate menus with right-clicks in their mind, so when you create a menu with a left-click, as is with the menu-bar, that is a UI inconsistency.

Menu-bars are already being discarded from Windows applications in Windows 7, simply because Microsoft has found a widget, the ribbon, which is better then this widget from 1983. I think modern Linux desktops such as Gnome and KDE should also try to adopt widgets such as the Ribbon in which are better then this 25 year old widget.

The menu-bar widget is also being discarded from the most used of applications: the web browser. Its missing from Google Chrome and the new mock-ups of Firefox look similar.

In addition, the applications/places/system menu-bar seen on the top of the screen is not that great of an application launcher system, it is being realized that a search-based system is far superior, so even in Gnome it looks like that menu-bar is going to be eliminated. There should be a desktop-wide process to eliminate this ancient widget.




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 Nice idea

 
 by d1337r on: Jan 6 2010
 
Score 50%

Quite a nice idea. But the window menus should be not accessible by right-click, but by another button *on* the title or the Alt button (the one used in accessing menus now). Or clicking on the icon opens that menu and the right-click opens a usual context menu (Minimize, Maximize, Close, Move to desktop #, Always on Top...)


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 Re: Nice idea

 
 by kamathln on: Jan 7 2010
 
Score 50%

I secondd that


kool-look
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 Re: Nice idea

 
 by jhuni on: Jan 8 2010
 
Score 50%

I agree that there should be a option for "keyboard users" to get to the menu by clicking 'Alt.'

As for "mouse users", the title-bar icon/button is too hard to target and small icons do not have much explanatory power, so that solution does not seem to work very well.

In addition to this, buttons that open up different menus when you left/right click have appeared in KDE and they are a UI disaster! The user has no idea how to get to the correct menu - it is simply too confusing. The way I get around this is I propose that all menus come come to be from right-clicks. It is already a habit for most mouse users that right-clicking produces menus, so that habit should be maintained.

Now lets consider my solution - make it so that you right-click on the title-bar. This replaces the "Minimize/Maximize/Close" context menu. Right now you can get to that menu by right-clicking on a taskbar button, clicking "Alt+Space", left-clicking the title-bar icon, or by just left-clicking the title-bar buttons. There is already enormous duplication and I have found that few users really depend on the title-bar's context menu. I personally prefer right-clicking on the taskbar button or clicking "Alt+Space.

As such, I don't see any good reason to keep the title-bar context menu when the application main-menu would be used far more often, and the position on the title-bar would make it easy to access for "mouse users."


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 ...

 
 by Chrispy on: Jan 6 2010
 
Score 50%

What about Toolbars?

What about applications like nautilus which already have a very large Contextmenu? I guess it's not applicabe to merge the Menubar and Contextmenu here.


never let your sense of moral interfere you at doing the right thing ^_^
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 Re: ...

 
 by jhuni on: Jan 6 2010
 
Score 50%

Ribbons/tool-bars appear to be superior widgets to menu-bars because they contain complex widgets that otherwise would have been in dialogs.

As for Nautilus, I use that application a lot and I rarely ever use the menu-bar. The hot-keys and the tool-bars appear to be superior.

In order to organize the menus in Nautilus the "Tabs" menu should be moved to the tab-bar and more functions like "Select All" should be accessible from right-clicking on a blank space. In addition, I agree that there should be an option to get to the main-menu by clicking 'Alt.'


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 Good idea

 
 by tuxvoytec on: Jan 6 2010
 
Score 50%

Your solution has already probably Gnome Globalmenu. Very good solution.


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 NeXTSTEP

 
 by aleksey on: Jan 6 2010
 
Score 50%

I think that NeXTSTEP-like menus will be cool!

http://www.wiseontech.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/nextstep4.jpg
Menu at top left corner.
This menu is dragable and autohiding.


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 Re: NeXTSTEP

 
 by d1337r on: Jan 7 2010
 
Score 50%

That menu system has one problem: it eats up even more screen space and leaves even more waste than the original menus! And even if this is really more useful than the original menu, manipulating this may be very hard for newbies. The best opinion is either a button on the toolbar (which requires every app to have it's own toolbar button). The other solution is hiding the menus completely, and requiring to hit some key or a button on the window border.
For the key variant, it would be better for the experienced users that use keyboard not only when typing :) But the ones who prefer mouse won't like it.
The window border icon variant, however, requires all the window managers to add in such a button. Even though we are talking only about GTK+ apps, all the WMs should be remade to include an extra button (at least Metacity, KWin, Xfwm and Openbox).

So, my final solution: there should be an option, or a GTK+ module a-la Global Menu, that shows a window menu when hitting Alt (that's the button most people used to access menus), not forgetting about Alt+button combinations (you know, Alt+F for File, Alt+E for Edit and so on).


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 Interesting Idea

 
 by svenofix on: Jan 14 2010
 
Score 50%

I think it will be pretty hard getting most people to switch from taskbar/menu bars to something new if they've been using that since starting to use a computer.

I like what they did in Chromium (and I assume Chrome as well) and Firefox mockups; having the menus accessible from one button. Having the tabs in the title bar is ingenious, since it's just wasted space anyways, but not all applications need tabs. So maybe having the menus in the title bar would make more sense?

The desktop seems like a complete waste of space to me. Maybe if the task bar were more integrated into the desktop rather than being an extra widget would help.

For the 'Start' or 'Applications Places Sytem' menus, you could have a floating widget which can be places anywhere on the screen and when clicked on provides you with your usual menus.


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 I HAVE ALREADY ACHIEVED THIS..

 
 by moeenn on: Mar 1 2010
 
Score 50%

I HAVEALREADY ACHIEVED THIS THING. HERE ARE THE SCREENSHOTS AND EXPLANATION:
http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php?content=120915&vote=good&tan=35803464


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